Interview with Sebastian Mayer

Sebastian Mayer is a photographer with an unruly, curious eye. He is well-known to magazine readers all over the world for his portraits of musicians. However, it was his RANDOM series what really caught my attention. A juxtaposition of two seemingly random photographs which attract and repel each other at the same time, causing a wonderfully provoking, eye-opening tension each time you look. A sublime visual blast of a two-verse haiku: anachronistically honest and disruptively up-to-date. I met Sebastian Mayer in his apartment in Wedding to talk not only about the concept behind the RANDOM series, but also about his personal detours and the experience of time in his photographic oeuvre.

image
Sebastian Mayer. Photo: P.K.

Peter Koval: What was your most beautiful detour?

Sebastian Mayer: It was when I didn’t fly back from London to Berlin but instead, went to Rio de Janeiro and then stayed on the road for the next nine years.

PK: That’s almost an Odyssey!

SM: [Laughing.] I wouldn’t compare myself to Ulysses.

PK: How did it feel returning back?

SM: For a while I felt like I was encountering echoes from my own past. I lived in Berlin from the beginning of the 1990s until 2005. That’s a relatively long period. I take many pictures on the streets and the city didn’t really change much during my nine-year absence.

PK: How was Tokyo different from Berlin?

SM: Tokyo is an enormously dynamic city. It’s almost like an autonomous organism which constantly changes. You step out of a subway station in a neighborhood you haven’t visited in three months and you don’t recognize the streets anymore because everything was demolished and newly rebuilt. As a photographer, that makes Tokyo much more interesting than Berlin. Berlin is very rigid in comparison. When houses are built in Berlin, they are supposed to stand for the next 300 years or even longer. In Tokyo they may last 30 years. In Tokyo you see something new each day, there is almost no repetition or monotony in the cityscape. The city appears to me like an organism – incredibly fascinating but also quite monstrous and dangerous – not because of violence in the streets but because of the enormous dimensions. You are at the mercy of its dimensions. The city threatens to swallow you, it will literally absorb you. For me Berlin was always a city of concrete, of cobblestones and unfettered growth. Tokyo is rather like quicksilver. It’s amazing to look at it, everything glitters, everything moves, nothing is inflexible and everything is surface. But if you get too close, it can be extremely toxic.

image
Tokyo. © Sebastian Mayer

PK: Photography records a moment of presence, which automatically makes looking at photography an act of retrospection. You worked a lot with your archive during the last year. What was that like?

SM: Of course, in the moment you press the shutter release button, it becomes sentimental. You can go mad if you think of the past too much. It was for a good reason that Susan Sontag described photography as a melancholic medium. When I go through my pictures from 2006, I recall many situations I am personally attached to. When I look into my archive for too long, I lose contact with the now. You shouldn’t dig too deep into your archives, otherwise the danger is that you will live only in a photographic copy of your own past without being able to perceive the present. It’s quite narcissistic to stick your nose only in your own past. That’s another problem with the essence of photography.

image
image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: In this regard, the archive seems to be very similar to all the selfies, which are hurrying ahead of us.

SM: In Beijing or Shanghai, I often observed people who are taking selfies all the time. But also in Venice, you often see people walking through the street with a selfie stick in their hand without really seeing anything from the town. Some of them carry their GoPro cameras or smartphones on a selfie stick in front of them like an antenna – the camera pointing back to them. They look all the time only in the camera, while the display is turned to them so they can watch themselves walking through Venice. They aren’t really present. They see only their own mirrored video image. Theoretically, they could walk in front of an empty projection wall and the images of Venice or any other random place could be copied into the background. It wouldn’t make any difference. For me, that’s absolutely crazy. It can’t be more narcissistic.

PK: During your last exhibition one of your pictures received quite a bit of interest.

SM: Oh, that one with the ass!

image
Golden Showers at Galerie BerlinTokyo, Berlin 1999. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Yes, that one. The longer I look at the picture, the clearer I see that it withholds something, that there is something I’m not permitted to see.

SM: Yes. There are only three visible faces, and their expressions allude to the reaction of those who are out of the frame. You can only guess what’s going on there at the moment. The photography leaves many questions unanswered, which makes it interesting. On the other hand, it’s totally pop and direct: a naked ass. I believe the picture was received that broadly because it’s at the same time very direct, almost obscene and yet it doesn’t show everything the viewer wants to see.

PK: And how do you create that allusion as a photographer? How do you show that you hide something?

SM: In my pictures, the concept of a gap plays an important role. My whole RANDOM series is based on the gap between the pictures. It’s not about what you can actually see on the photographs but rather about what happens between them. For me, that’s sometimes even more interesting than working directly with the images. But even when I’m working with the individual images, I would say that a good image always bears a secret – something you can’t immediately see or understand. It’s this secret – the inexplicable – that makes us wanting to look at the picture again and again. The image continues to interest us because you don’t really know what’s going on, because you can’t really get to the bottom of the picture, because it remains at least partially inexplicable.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

I have a portrait of a friend which I took on the street in Nakameguro Tokyo. He is standing with an umbrella, his eyes pointed to the right, to something out of the frame. In the background, a couple people are crossing the street. For some reason, this image has a magic attraction to me. It’s a quite simple image, but I can’t get it out of my mind. The more I look at it, the more I try to understand why I’m so drawn to this image, why I’m so fascinated by it. Is it because of the lines, the colors, the look or maybe the composition? I just can’t figure it out. That’s why it remains interesting for me. Some pictures contain this kind of magic. Even after you look at them thousands of times, they still want to be viewed and they will remain interesting.

PK: Where do these gaps come from?

SM: I can’t really tell. When I’m holding the camera, I’m not looking for the gaps. They emerge later, while viewing the pictures. Here is one photograph, which I still consider to be one of my best portraits. It was taken from a bathroom wall from a 5-cm distance. It’s a little sticker, that somebody tried to tear off. That’s why the context is missing.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

The facial expression of the man is distorted, one arm is pulled up, it looks like he is falling or about to lose consciousness. But because half of the picture is torn off, we can’t really see what’s going on there. Was the man just shot down? Is he on drugs at a rock concert and is about to flip out? This information is missing so we simply can’t know. At the same time the tear has a form of wings, which gives the man on the photo an angelic appearance. For me, that’s something very interesting because it opens a meta level for interpretation. But the image was just there and I took it with me. I took many pictures from books, magazines or billboards. Actually, I don’t really care where the images are from. When I take a photo of them, then they also become my images. It’s the art of appropriation; Prince sends his regards.

PK: But the RANDOM series is based on a different concept.

SM: It’s a juxtaposition of two seemingly random photographs which, if upon closer inspection, have an associative relationship. That can happen either through the content or the form. But sometimes, two pictures just “click” without an explicit reason why the combination works or why the tension occurs. The individual pictures aren’t so important here, but the mere fact of the juxtaposition. Here is for example a combination with the photo we were already talking about:

image
image

RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

in one picture it’s obviously raining, while on the other, there is a cut-off fish head. There is no obvious connection in content or form. However, something happens here. It’s like putting together two words. Each word is nice and can stand by itself, but already two words can produce a tension that goes far beyond the meaning of each word. I am very fascinated by this poetic tension. [Lights a cigarette.] I like to work with sequences. Narratives were always very important to me. I believe it comes from the fact that I began my artistic career as a comic artist.

PK: Tell me more about your comic art.

SM: During my first years in Berlin, I spent almost all my time at the drawing board. I couldn’t really talk to people and I apparently suffered under a severe social phobia or a communication disturbance. I still know how it felt to get palpitations each time when I wanted to buy cigarettes at Café Westphal at Kollwitzplatz, because I couldn’t stand the looks of all the people there. I was so scared of them. Each time I entered the room, I felt all the eyes were staring at me, but I had to cross the room because the cigarette vending machine was at the opposite corner. That’s why I went out among people as rarely as possible and was only drawing for several hours a day for three or four years. But I didn’t really want to tell a story with the comics back then. It was more experimental – taking some fragments, putting them together and watching if something would happen. It’s a little bit like William Burroughs’ Cut Ups, even I wasn’t working with scissors. I like to think that I am strongly influenced by the Cut-Up idea, especially when I’m reviewing my RANDOM series.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: How do you take photographs?

SM: Quite simple. I take my camera, I go out and start making photographs. There are many photographers who have to make a plan first, who first try to develop an image in their head, let’s say of a person they want to portray. They think a lot about how they are going to take the picture, how they want the person on the picture look like or which light should they use. These photographers often become very nervous during the photo shooting. They can’t control everything or the person doesn’t want to fit into their imagined picture. I try to be as open as possible. Especially while working on assignments where I have actually only a couple of minutes to shoot the photo – for example when I portrait musicians for Spex. In such situations, it’s almost impossible to implement your own idea. Then the best thing is to focus on the person from the first second on and to take what you get. I think it’s also more honest and direct. I have nothing against arranged or well-designed photos and I’m actually quite good at implementing planned pictures for commercial clients. However, in my artistic works I’m interested in as direct and authentic a picture as possible.

image
Iggy Pop. © Sebastian Mayer.

SM: Yes, you leave things out. The framing cuts automatically everything else away.

PK: That’s a quite violent act, isn’t it?

SM: I wouldn’t call it “violent”, ideally it’s more like a chirurgic incision. But there are ways to be “violent” with photography. Last year I made an experimental installation. I took all the pictures that I made during my last trip to Japan and projected them all in one sequence in a brutal speed of 60-70 images per second. I consciously didn’t leave anything out. It was around seven thousand pictures, some of them just random snapshots of room ceilings or flash tests. Literally everything I had. It was absolutely hypnotic to watch the “film”. The images weren’t planned as a stop-motion animation. They were all meant to be viewed as individual pictures. At the limited speed of perception of the human eye, by the time some pictures made an impression, they were already being overlapped by ten subsequent pictures.

PK: The duration of looking is related to the depth of the photography…

SM: I have to think of Michelangelo Antonioni’s film Blow-Up when you say that. The longer you look at the picture, the more you can interpret into it. Photography is like a document. That’s what makes it so interesting. A two-dimensional reflection of reality that took place. Photography is standing still. That makes it an object of investigation. The more you look, the more you will find.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: You can decide not to take a picture. Sometimes you leave your camera deliberately at home. How about deleting pictures?

SM: I never delete a picture! I can’t do it. I would rather buy another four Terabytes of external storage to keep also all my black underexposed photographs in RAW format. I was on the road with just one suitcase for nine years. I really have no problems getting rid of things I don’t need or which aren’t functioning any more. To the contrary. But when it comes to photographs, that’s different.

PK: What is so different about photography?

SM: Five years ago, I exhibited the RANDOM series in Tokyo for the first time. I went through 15 years of my photographs and I chose some pictures I liked in the moment when I reviewed them. I’m sure I would chose different pictures from the same archive today because my perspective has changed and will also change again in the future. Different time and different context allows us to see different images in the same photographs and also to discover new connections between them. I have so many blurred photographs or photographs that seem insignificant – with just a big toe on a beach or so – and I often ask myself if I should keep them or not. In the first moment, you might not be able to really see anything meaningful in the photograph, sometimes it’s just blurred or totally underexposed and black. But it could be that when we look at the picture for the 500th time, then we finally will find something we couldn’t see before.

image
Underexposed photography. © Sebastian Mayer.

It’s also a question of technology. Recently I read that it should be theoretically possible to reconstruct the sound of ancient spaces from the pottery found by archeologists. The bristles of the straws which formed a vase hundreds years ago also made grooves, and as the straws were vibrating, excited by the sounds around them, they must have recorded the sounds just like on a vinyl record. With appropriate technology, the grooves could be played like a gramophone, allowing us to hear the sounds of the original environment. I’m not sure if it’s really possible to extract these sounds, but the idea itself is immensely fascinating to me! I see it similarly with my black underexposed photographs. Maybe one day, we will have techniques which we cannot imagine today, which can extract a properly exposed picture from an underexposed RAW file. That’s why I still keep all my completely black pictures. Maybe there is something interesting on them that I just can not see yet.

So I’m sitting on the whole mountain of pictures and I have to step down at a certain point to find the people, because I have something to say to them. I don’t know exactly how many pictures I have by now. I guess around one million: 700,000 digital and 300,000 on negatives. And how many pictures do I need to tell a story? Three? Ten? A million? [Laughs.]

///
In Berlin, June 2017
Interview & photo of Sebastian Mayer: © Peter Koval
All other photos © Sebastian Mayer (http://www.sebastianmayer.com)
English editor: Elle Peril

Interview mit Sebastian Mayer

Der Blick des Fotografen Sebastian Mayer geht unter die Haut. Seine Musikerporträts dürften Magazinlesern auf der ganzen Welt bekannt sein. Mein Interesse weckte er aber erst mit seiner RANDOM Serie. Das sind immer Zwei, als ob zufällig nebeneinander gestellte Fotografien, die sich anscheinend nichts zu sagen haben. Erst bei näherer Betrachtung entfaltet sich vor dem Auge des Betrachters zwischen den zwei Bildern ein Gespräch. Das Faszinierende daran ist, dass dieses Gespräch jedesmal, wenn man die Bilder betrachtet, anders verläuft.

Ich traf Sebastian Mayer in seiner Wohnung in Wedding, um mit ihm nicht nur über das Konzept der RANDOM Serie zu sprechen, sondern auch über seine persönlichen Umwege und über die Bedeutung von Zeit in seinem fotografischen Werk.

image
Sebastian Mayer. Foto: P.K.

Peter Koval: Was war dein schönster Umweg?

Sebastian Mayer: Nicht aus London nach Berlin zurückzufliegen, sondern nach Rio de Janeiro und dann neun Jahre unterwegs zu sein.

PK: Das ist ja fast eine Odyssee!

SM: [Lacht.] Ich würde mich nicht direkt mit Odysseus vergleichen.

PK: Wie war denn die Rückkehr?

SM: Ich hatte eine zeitlang das Gefühl, auf ein Echo meiner eigenen Vergangenheit zu stoßen. Ich lebte von Anfang der 1990er bis 2005 in Berlin. Das ist eine relativ lange Zeit. Ich mache viele Bilder auf der Strasse und so radikal hat sich die Stadt während der neun Jahre meiner Abwesenheit nun auch nicht verändert.

PK: War Tokio visuell ein so starker Kontrast zu Berlin?

SM: Tokio ist eine enorm dynamische Stadt. Es ist fast wie ein eigenständiger Organismus, der sich dauerhaft ändert. Du steigst nach drei Monaten aus einer U-Bahn Station aus, die du eigentlich gut kennst und plötzlich kennst du dich nicht mehr aus, weil der komplette Stadtteil um die Station herum abgerissen und neu hochgezogen wurde. Das macht Tokio für mich als Fotografen wesentlich interessanter als Berlin. Im vergleich dazu ist Berlin sehr starr. In Berlin baut man Häuser, die für die nächsten 300 Jahre oder sogar noch länger stehen sollen. In Tokio sind es vielleicht 30 Jahre. In Tokio sieht man jeden Tag etwas Neues, es gibt kaum Wiederholung und Monotonie im Stadtbild. Dadurch wirkt die Stadt wie ein Organismus – unglaublich faszinierend, aber auch monströs und gefährlich. Aber nicht etwa wegen der Gewalt auf den Straßen, sondern einfach wegen des ungeheuerlichen Ausmaßes, dem man als Einzelner ausgeliefert ist. Die Stadt droht einen zu verschlingen, man wird von ihr regelrecht einverleibt. Berlin war für mich immer eine Stadt des Betons, der Pflastersteine und des Wildwuchses. Tokio ist eher wie Quecksilber. Es ist wahnsinnig toll anzuschauen, alles glitzert, alles bewegt sich, nichts ist starr und alles ist Oberfläche. Aber wenn man dem Ganzen zu nahe kommt, wirkt es extrem toxisch.

image
Tokio. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Fotografie hält einen Augenblick der Gegenwart fest. Das macht jede Betrachtung der Fotografie automatisch zum Rückblick. Du hast in der letzten Zeit viel mit deinem Archiv gearbeitet. Wie war es?

SM: Klar. In dem Moment, in dem man auf den Auslöser drückt, wird es sentimental. Wenn man zu viel über die Vergangenheit nachdenkt, kann es einen wahnsinnig machen. Susan Sontag hat nicht grundlos Fotografie als ein melancholisches Medium beschrieben. Wenn ich heute durch meine Bilder aus dem Jahr 2006 gehe, dann sind viele Situationen dabei, die mich persönlich betreffen. Wenn ich zu lange durch mein Archiv schaue, dann bewege ich mich bald nur noch in meiner eigenen Vergangenheit, dann verliere ich den Kontakt zum Jetzt. Man darf nicht zu tief ins Archiv sinken, sonst wird die Gefahr groß, dass man nur noch in einer fotografischen Kopie seiner eigenen Vergangenheit lebt, ohne das Jetzt noch wahrnehmen zu können. Es ist auch tatsächlich ziemlich narzisstisch, seine Nase nur in die eigene Vergangenheit zu stecken. Das ist noch ein weiteres Problem mit dem Wesen der Fotografie.

image
image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Das eigene Fotoarchiv unterscheidet sich in dieser Hinsicht gar nicht so sehr von den vorauseilenden Selbstbildern auf den Selfies.

SM: In Peking oder Shanghai habe ich sehr oft Leute beobachtet, die ständig nur Selfies machen. Aber auch in Venedig sieht man häufig Menschen, die mit einem Selfiestick in der Hand durch die Stadt laufen, ohne was von ihr wirklich zu sehen. Während diese Touristen durch die Stadt gehen, sie sich also bewegen und nicht stehen, tragen manche ihre GoPro Kameras oder Smartphones am Selfiestick vor sich her wie eine Antenne – die Kamera von vorne zurück auf sie selbst gerichtet. Sie schauen die ganze Zeit nur in die Kamera, während der Bildschirm ihnen ebenfalls zugewandt ist und ihnen ihr eigenes Bild zurückspiegelt, wie sie gerade durch Venedig laufen. Die sind gar nicht mehr da, die schauen sich nur noch ihr eigenes Video-Spiegelbild an. Sie könnten theoretisch auch vor einer leeren Projektionswand laufen und die Bilder von Venedig oder auch von jedem beliebigen Ort könnten dann einfach im Nachhinein tricktechnisch in den Hintergrund kopiert werden. Das würde wahrscheinlich kaum einen Unterscheid machen. Für mich ist das verrückt, narzisstischer geht’s nicht mehr.

PK: Während deiner letzten Ausstellung wurde eine Fotografie breit rezipiert…

SM: Ach, die mit dem Hintern!

image
Golden Showers at Galerie BerlinTokyo, Berlin 1999. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Genau die meine ich. Je länger ich sie betrachte, desto klarer sehe ich, dass sie mir etwas vorenthält, dass ich etwas nicht sehe.

SM: Ja. Die Gesichtsausdrücke der Menschen sind nur an drei Gesichtern angedeutet. Man kann nur vermuten, was da gerade passiert. Die Fotografie lässt Vieles offen, aber dadurch wird sie erst interessant. Auf der anderen Seite ist es total pop und direkt: Ein nackter Hintern. Ich glaube, das Bild ist auch deswegen so breit rezipiert worden, weil es gleichzeitig sehr direkt ist, fast schon obszön, und trotzdem nicht alles zeigt, was man als Betrachter sehen möchte.

PK: Und wie macht man das als Fotograf? Wie zeigt man, dass man etwas nicht zeigt?

SM: Bei meinen Bildern geht es oft um die Lücke. Meine ganze RANDOM Serie basiert auf der Lücke zwischen den Bildern. Es geht nicht so sehr darum, was auf den Fotografien zu sehen ist, sondern vielmehr darum, was zwischen ihnen passiert. Das ist für mich manchmal sogar viel interessanter als unmittelbar mit den Bildern zu arbeiten. Aber auch wenn ich mit Einzelbildern arbeite, auch dann würde ich sagen, dass ein gutes Bild immer ein Geheimnis birgt – etwas, was man nicht sofort sehen oder begreifen kann. Es ist dieses Geheimnis, dieses Unerklärliche, das dafür sorgt, dass man sich ein Bild immer wieder anschauen kann und will. Es bleibt interessant, weil man eben nicht wirklich weiß, was los ist, weil man es nicht ganz und gar ergründen kann, weil es bis zu einem Teil unerklärlich bleibt.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

Ich habe da ein Bild, ein Portrait von einem Freund, das ich auf der Strasse in Nakameguro Tokyo aufgenommen habe. Er steht da mit einem Regenschirm und schaut mit den Augen nach rechts aus dem Bild heraus, im Hintergrund laufen ein paar Menschen über die Strasse. Aus irgendeinem Grund übt das Bild eine magische Anziehungskraft auf mich aus. Das ist ein ganz einfaches Bild, aber ich komme davon nicht los. Je öfter ich es anschaue, desto mehr versuche ich zu ergründen, warum ich so zu diesem Bild hingezogen bin, warum es mich so stark fasziniert. Ich finde es aber nicht heraus, ich kann nicht sagen: Es sind die Linien, die Farben, sein Blick vielleicht oder die Bildkomposition. Ich finde es einfach nicht heraus. Genau dadurch bleibt es aber für mich interessant. Einige Bilder haben so eine Magie, das sind die Bilder, die auch beim tausendsten mal draufschauen immer noch angeschaut werden wollen und immer interessant bleiben.

PK: Woher kommen die Lücken?

SM: Das kann ich so nicht beantworten. Wenn ich die Kamera in der Hand halte, dann suche ich nicht nach den Lücken. Sie tauchen meist erst später, beim Betrachten der Bilder auf. Hier ist eine Fotografie, welche ich immer noch für eines meiner besten Portraits halte, und das obwohl ich es von einer Toilettenwand aus 5 cm Entfernung abfotografiert habe. Es ist ein kleiner Aufkleber, den jemand versucht hat abzureißen. Dadurch fehlt der Kontext.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

Der Gesichtsausdruck dieses Menschen ist verzerrt, eine Hand ist nach oben gerissen, er wirkt wie im Fall oder als würde er gerade ohnmächtig werden oder als wäre er von irgendetwas getroffen. Dadurch, dass das Bild aber zur Hälfte weggerissen ist, sieht man eben nicht, was eigentlich los ist. Wird der Mann gerade erschossen? Ist er auf Drogen auf einem Rockkonzert und rastet gleich aus? Diese Bildinformation fehlt, man kann es nicht wissen. Der Riß hat aber gleichzeitig eine Form von Flügeln und das verleiht dem abgelichteten Mann etwas Engelhaftes. Das finde ich sehr interessant, weil sich dadurch eine Meta-Ebene öffnet. Aber das Bild war da und ich nahm es einfach mit. Ich fotografiere ohnehin viel aus Büchern und Zeitschriften oder von Werbetafeln ab. Mir ist es eigentlich egal, woher die Bilder kommen. Wenn ich sie abfotografiert habe, dann sind das auch meine Bilder. Das ist dann wohl Appropriation-Art; Prince lässt grüßen.

PK: Die RANDOM Serie ist aber anders konzipiert.

SM: Das sind immer zwei, als ob zufällig nebeneinander gestellte Fotografien, die bei näherer Betrachtung einen assoziativen Bezug erkennen lassen. Das kann entweder über Form oder über Inhalt passieren, aber manchmal “klicken” zwei Bilder auch einfach, ohne dass ich einen Grund finden kann, warum die Kombination funktioniert, warum da auf einmal eine Spannung entsteht. Die Einzelbilder selber sind dann gar nicht so wichtig, sondern allein die Tatsache der Nebeneinander- oder besser Gegenüberstellung. Zum Beispiel hier, eine Kombination mit demselben Bild über das wir vorhin geredet haben:

image
image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

Auf einem Bild regnet es offensichtlich und auf dem anderen ist ein abgeschnittener Fischkopf, da gibt es keinen offensichtlichen Zusammenhang im Inhalt oder in der Form. Trotzdem passiert da etwas. Es ist, wie wenn man zwei Wörter zusammensteckt. Jedes Wort für sich kann schön und interessant sein, aber bereits zwei Wörter nebeneinander erzeugen eine Spannung, die weit über die Bedeutung der einzelnen Wörter hinaus wirkt. Eben diese poetische Spannung fasziniert mich. [Zündet sich eine Zigarette an.] Ich arbeite gern mit Sequenzen. Narrative und Zusammenhänge waren immer sehr wichtig für mich. Ich glaube, das liegt daran, dass ich als Comic-Zeichner angefangen habe.

PK: Erzähl mal!

SM: Während meiner ersten Jahre in Berlin saß ich nur am Zeichentisch. Ich konnte nicht wirklich mit den Menschen reden und litt anscheinend unter einer starken sozialen Phobie und Kommunikationsstörung. Ich weiß immer noch, wie ich, immer wenn ich Zigaretten im Café Westphal am Kollwitzplatz geholt habe, Herzklopfen bekommen habe, weil ich die Blicke der anwesenden Menschen im Lokal nicht ertragen konnte; sie haben mir furchtbare Angst gemacht. Wenn ich den Raum betrat dann fühlte ich mich von allen Seiten angestarrt, es war grausam. Ich musste aber durch das ganze Lokal gehen, weil der Zigarettenautomat auf der anderen Seite des Raumes stand. Also habe ich nur gezeichnet. Drei oder vier Jahre lang, mehrere Stunden täglich. Bei den Comics ging es mir damals allerdings nicht so sehr darum, eine Story zu erzählen, sondern vielmehr darum, Fragmente zu nehmen, zusammenzukleben und zu sehen, was passiert. So ein bisschen wie William Borroughs Cut Ups, auch wenn ich nicht mit Schere gearbeitet habe. Ich glaube sowieso, dass ich ziemlich von der Cut-Up-Idee beeinflusst bin, gerade auch bei den RANDOM-Arbeiten.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Wie gehst du beim Fotografieren vor?

SM: Ganz einfach. Ich nehme meine Kamera und gehe los. Es gibt viele Fotografen, die zuerst einen Plan machen, die ein bestimmtes Bild, zum Beispiel von jemandem, den sie porträtieren wollen, im Kopf entwickeln. Sie denken viel darüber nach, wie sie die Person fotografieren wollen, wie sie auf dem Bild aussehen soll, oder welches Licht sie gern verwenden würden. Solche Fotografen werden dann beim Shooting oft sehr nervös. Weil eben irgendetwas nicht stimmt, oder weil sich die Person in das vorgestellte Bild nicht wirklich fügen will. Ich versuche es immer so offen wie möglich zu lassen. Gerade bei kurzen Terminen – wenn ich etwa Musiker für die Spexporträtiere –, da habe ich manchmal wirklich nur einige wenige Minuten, um ein Foto zu schießen. In solchen Situationen wird man nur schwer eine eigene Bildidee umsetzen können. Dann muss man sich am besten von der ersten Sekunde an auf die porträtierte Person einstellen und das nehmen, was man kriegt. Ich finde das auch ehrlicher und direkter. Ich habe nichts gegen “gestellte” oder “konzipierte” Fotos und ich bin tatsächlich auch sehr gut in der Umsetzung von geplanten Bildern, wenn ich für kommzerzielle Kunden arbeite. Aber bei meinen künstlerischen Arbeiten interessiert mich das meist nicht, da soll das alles so direkt und unmittelbar wirken wie möglich.

image
Iggy Pop. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Die Kamera ist ein Rahmen. Da passt nicht alles rein…

SM: Ja, du lässt Dinge weg. Durch die Ausschnittfindung schneidest du automatisch alles andere weg.

PK: Macht das nicht Fotografie manchmal zu einem ziemlich gewalttätigen Akt?

SM: Es kommt drauf an. Letztes Jahr habe ich als Experiment eine Installation gemacht. Ich habe alle Fotografien genommen, die ich während meiner letzten Reise in Japan aufgenommen habe und habe sie dann bei einem brutalen Tempo von 60-70 Bildern pro Sekunde hintereinander projiziert. Ich habe ganz bewußt nichts aussortiert. Es waren etwa sieben Tausend Fotografien, teilweise nur Schnappschüsse, irgendwelche Zimmerecken, Blitztests… Einfach alles. Es war absolut hypnotisch, dem “Film” zu folgen. Die Bilder habe ich ja nicht als Stop-Motion-Animation geplant, sondern wirklich nur auf Einzelaufnahmen geachtet. Bei einer Geschwindigkeit, die gerade so fassbar fürs Auge ist, blieb immer wieder ein ganz bestimmtes Bild scheinbar zufällig für einen ganz kurzen Moment im Kopf hängen, während es in der Zeit bereits von weiteren zehn Bildern überlagert wurde.

PK: Die Dauer der Betrachtung hängt mit der Tiefe der Fotografie zusammen…

SM: Dabei denke ich sofort an Michelangelo Antonionis Film Blow-Up. Je länger und je näher man hinschaut, desto mehr sieht man und desto mehr kann man auch hinein interpretieren. Eine Fotografie ist wie ein Dokument. Das macht sie ja richtig interessant. Ein zweidimensionales Abbild einer stattgefundenen Realität. Die Fotografie wird dadurch, dass sie still steht, erforschbar und betrachtbar. Je näher und länger du hinschaust, desto mehr findest du.

image
RANDOM series. © Sebastian Mayer.

PK: Du kannst dich entscheiden, ein Foto nicht zu machen. Du lässt manchmal auch ganz bewußt die Kamera zu Hause liegen. Wie ist es mit dem Löschen?

SM: Ich lösche nichts! Nein. Ich kann es nicht. Dann hole ich mir lieber weitere vier Terrabyte Speicher, damit ich auch all die schwarzen unterbelichteten Bilder im RAW-Format behalten kann. Ich war neun Jahre lang nur mit einem Koffer unterwegs. Ich habe wirklich kein Problem damit, Sachen, die ich nicht unbedingt brauche oder die nicht mehr funktionieren, wegzuwerfen. Ganz im Gegenteil. Bei den Fotografien ist es anders.

PK: Was ist bei den Fotografien anders?

SM: Vor fünf Jahren habe ich die RANDOM Serie zum ersten mal in Tokio ausgestellt. Damals habe ich durch 15 Jahre meiner Fotos geschaut und habe bestimmte Bilder ausgewählt, die ich in dem Moment der Betrachtung gut fand. Ich würde heute aus demselben Archiv bestimmt ganz andere Bilder auswählen, denn meine Perspektive hat sich geändert und wird sich auch weiterhin ändern. Eine andere Zeit und ein anderer Kontext lassen uns in denselben Fotografien immer neue Bilder, immer neue Zusammenhänge entdecken. Es gibt ganz viele verwackelte und verschwommene Fotografien oder solche, auf denen man vielleicht nur seinen großen Zeh am Strand sieht und man sich schon fragt, ob man das Bild behalten will oder nicht. Man sieht da im ersten Moment nichts, alles ist unscharf oder einfach nur komplett schwarz und unterbelichtet. Es kann aber eben sein, dass man auf dem Bild, wenn man es zum fünfhundertsten mal betrachtet, doch etwas findet, was man zuvor nicht sah.

image
Eine unterbelichtete Fotografie. © Sebastian Mayer.

Es ist auch eine Frage der Technik. Neulich habe ich gelesen, dass es theoretisch möglich sein müsste, von alten gedrehten Tonvasen Klänge herauszufiltern, die von den Borsten der Halme, die vor hunderten von Jahren den Ton geformt haben, dort in den feuchten Ton geritzt wurden. Man könnte so den Klang des Ortes rekonstruieren, alleine anhand der winzigen Schwingungen der Halme im Ton. Das ist doch faszinierend! So ähnlich sehe ich das mit meinen schwarzen Fotos auch. Irgendwann wird es vielleicht Techniken geben, die wir uns heute noch gar nicht vorstellen können, die aus einer schwarzen unterbelichteten RAW-Datei ein ordentlich belichtetes Bild extrahieren können. Daher behalte ich auch meine ganzen komplett schwarzen Bilder. Vielleicht ist ja dann doch etwas Interessantes drauf.

///

In Berlin, Juni 2017
Interview & Foto von Sebstian Mayer: © Peter Koval
Fotografien © Sebastian Mayer (http://www.sebastianmayer.com)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *